Moving into former rental - Section 45(3) Deemed Disposition of Rental house or property

My question is: Canadian-specific

QUESTION: Hello
My husband and I have recently bought a mobile home on an acre in Nelson to move to in a few years when we find work there, or much later when we retire.  We currently live in a rented apartment near Vancouver as we work in town.  Our mobile home is rented out to tenants and we intend to let them stay until we would like to move to Nelson.  It is the only home that we own but it is rented out until we can move there. Can you let us know how that would affect us in terms of Capital Gains?  I know that each year we will have to claim the rental income and write off our costs for the mobile home / land against it.  Thank you very much for your feedback.

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david ingramn replies:


When you move into the former rental, it is considered a deemed disposal and re-acquisiton.  Capital Gains tax is due and payable on any increase in value at that time.

 UNLESS

If while renting, you did NOT claim CCA (Capital cost Allowance) or depreciation on the T776 (rental schedule), you can defer paying the tax at that time though.

When you do move in, calculate the increase in value and report Half on schedule 3 of your return and half on schedule 3 of your husband's return That schedule will, in turn, result in one half of the half being put on line 127 of your return as taxable income. 

You can now write a letter to the Tax office stating: " I hereby elect to defer opaying the tax triggered by my moving into my rental property under Section 45(3) of the income tax act."

You then write the amount on line 127 on line 256 where it is subtracted from taxable income.  Write - see election letter  beside line 256.

These older Questions are in the same vein. �

Subject: Buying a house to move into in 4 years -David Ingram expert income tax help and preparation of US Canada Mexico non-resident and cross border returns with rental dividend wages self-employed and royalty foreign tax credits family estate trust trusts income tax convention treaty
From: David Ingram <taxman@centa.com>
Date: Sat, 24 Feb 2007 20:21:54 -0800
To: centapede-ca <centapede-ca@lists.centa.com>


My question is: Canadian-specific

QUESTION: We in the process of purchasing a house in Penticton and will rent it out, retire (in about 4 years)and  move into it ourselves.  If we live there for 2 or more years are we liable for capital gains for the period we collected rental income?  What type of home insurance is best for a rental property?  What are your thoughts re the real estate market in the Okanagan in the next five years - steady growth or a slump after "2010"?  Many thanks, Jacalin

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david ingram replies:

You are liable for capital gains income tax for the period you rented it out.  In fact "When you move into the house", you will trigger a capital gains tax because of a change in use from a business use to a personal use.
The good news is that you can make an election under Section 45(3) of the income tax act to defer paying the tax until you actually sell the property. To make the calculation, fill in schedule 3 and put the taxable profit on line 127 of your T1.  then deduct the same amount on line 256 under Section 45(3).

I think the Okanagan AND the lower mainland markets are already overheated and think the prognosis is for little or no growth for the next five years but I have been wrong before.

That does not mean you should not buy because if I am wrong, it will cost so much more to buy six or seven years from now that you will be cursing me all the way to the mortgage broker.  If you buy and it goes down a bit, it does not matter because you are buying it to live in and that gives you the property in the future at today's price which is historically lower.

david ingram

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